Dating cultures around world

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Germans are a lot more direct than New Yorkers, especially in romance, she says.

“When [my boyfriend] was interested, he was talking to me every day, not pretending he wasn’t into me,” she says of her now-beau.

” Things are more straightforward when it comes to dating in Germany, says Jessica Parker, 33, who splits her time between NYC and Berlin.

It took the freelance publicist, who grew up on the Upper East Side, a while to get used to that.

“The dating scene is all about consuming people,” she says, “not getting to know people.” Forget about one-night stands and say hello to the setup in the Philippines.

Gecile Fojas, who moved from Rockland County to the city of Cebu, in the Philippines, three years ago, says dating is much harder in her new home, given the stigma of promiscuity.

“It’s not a stigma if you wait a few dates.” Jonathan, who moved to Jakarta, Indonesia after living in the East Village in 2013, says moving to a place that was predominantly Muslim made for some challenging cultural differences in dating.

“Here, a date is something more intimate or personal.

It’s expected that this might lead to something …” like sex, he says. Here it’s more like playing the game.” It is true what they say about Parisians: They’re snobs, and especially in the dating world, says Steph Naudin, 32, an American living in Paris and working at a university.

Although it’s hot, hot, hot on the Caribbean island, a date there may be anything but.

So when Andre, a salesman, moved to New York City from Jamaica about three years ago, he quickly learned the new meaning of a “date.” “Back home, a date is just going out with someone — watching a movie, hanging out, getting food — and that’s it,” says the 32-year-old Canarsie resident, who declined to give his last name for professional reasons.

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